Everything You Wanted to Know About Multiline Strings

Working with strings is probably one of the earliest things we get to do as C# developers. In fact, if you consider that most of us start with the "Hello, World!" example, you're being exposed to the string type right away. But as you continue to use strings, you'll quickly find that you want to work with strings that span multiple lines and how we define multiline strings might be a tricky topic for beginners. No sweat! In this article, we'll look at some simple code examples that demonstrate how to define multiline strings. I'll also link over to GitHub where you can see this code committed and pushed up to a public repository. Finally, the last example contains a special bonus that I think you'll like (even if it's a slightly more advanced topic). Read until the end! The…

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async void – How to Tame the Asynchronous Nightmare

You're an intermediate dotnet programmer and you mostly know your way around using Tasks. You sprinkle async and await through your code, and everything is working just as expected. You've heard time and time again that you always want the return types of your asynchronous methods to be a Task (or Task<T>) and that async void is essentially the root of all evil. No sweat. One day you go to wire up an event handler using the syntax myObject.SomeEvent += SomeEventHandler, and your event handler needs to await some asynchronous code. You take all of the right steps and change your method signature to get that beautiful async Task added in, replacing void. But suddenly you get a compile error about your event handler not being compatible. You feel trapped. You're scared. And then you do the unspeakable... You change…

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Simple Data Types in C#: A Beginner’s Guide

As a C# developer, understanding the different simple data types in C# and when to use them is crucial for writing efficient and maintainable code. I've been trying to spend more time this year putting together some content aimed at really introductory level programming. There's plenty of resources available online, but I want to do my part to ensure I can help break down some of the barriers for people getting started on their programming journey. In this beginner's guide, we will look at the basics of the most commonly used simple data types in C#, including int, float, double, byte, char, bool, and string. We will also look at how these data types differ from each other and when to use them in your C# programming! Integer Data Types The most commonly used integer data types in C# are…

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Tasks, BackgroundWorkers, and Threads – Simple Comparisons for Concurrency

(This article is intended to be a spiritual successor to this previous entry, and now includes Tasks!) Even if you're new to C#, you've probably come across at least one of Tasks, Threads, or BackgroundWorkers. With a bit of additional time, it's likely you've seen all three in your journey. They're all ways to run concurrent code in C# and each has its own set of pros and cons. In this article, we will explore how each one operates at a high level. It's worth noting that in most modern .NET applications and libraries you'll see things converging to Tasks. The Approach I've gone ahead and created a test application that you can find here. Because this is in source control, it's possible/likely that it will diverge from what we see in this article, so I just wanted to offer…

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Pythonnet – A Simple Union of .NET Core and Python You’ll Love

Python is a powerful and versatile programming language that has become increasingly popular. For many, it's one of the very first programming languages they pick up when getting started. Some of the highest traffic posts on my blog many years after they were written look at using C# and Python together. Today we're going to explore how you can use Python from inside a C# .NET Core application with much more modern approaches than my original articles. Enter Pythonnet! Pythonnet Package & Getting Started We're going to be looking at Python for .NET in order to accomplish this goal. This library allows you to take advantage of Python installed on the running machine from within your .NET Core applications. You must configure it to point at the corresponding Python DLL that you'd like to use, and after a couple of…

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The Hottest New Open Source OpenAI API for C#

If you have an internet connection then you have probably heard of ChatGPT from OpenAI by now. Odds are you might have even given it a whirl to see what it's all about. Personally, I know that I was quite skeptical at first but I've been blown away at how well it's able to converse about topics I ask it. I've even asked it to generate various scenarios for me and it will conclude by explaining why the different facets it chose were good choices. Incredible stuff. I'll be using this to help chip away at content for my role playing game. When it comes to using OpenAI effectively, I have a great deal to learn. It's all very new to me, especially with respect to how to structure prompts and get the most out of the interactions with such…

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TileMap – How To Get ALL The Tiles Effortlessly!

If you're building a 2D game in Unity3D, odds are you've come across the TileMap component. The TileMap is a powerful tool that allows you to create a grid of tiles that you can render your tiles with instead of hand-placing individual game objects with sprites. It has a host of built in functionality that you might otherwise find yourself manually writing, like mapping coordinates to particular cells on a map. And what's even cooler about using a TileMap? You don't need to handroll your own editor to paint tiles! I think I'd pass on having to do that. But have you found yourself in a situation where you want to get all of the painted tiles on a TileMap? You may have found it's not quite as obvious as you'd have hoped! What We Have To Work With On…

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Ascending to the Next Level – RPG Dev Weekly #1

As I've been trying to get more YouTube content put together more steadily, one of the themes I'm interested in is doing some behind-the-scenes of the role playing game (RPG) I'm making with some friends in Unity3D. I've found that being able to work on an RPG outside of my regular day job is a really awesome way for me to keep up on my technical skills. I love coding, and the further along I move in my career as an engineering manager, the less time I actually spend writing code myself. I pride myself in being a technical engineering manager, so for me working on this RPG is a great outlet for creativity and practice. I mentioned this in my LinkedIn post here: Persisting Game Objects Across Maps In this video, I focus on one of the challenges the…

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CircleCI + BitBucket => Free Continuous Integration!

CircleCI is a service that I heard about from a friend that allows you to get continuous integration pipelines built up for your repositories... And it does it quick and easy. Also, free if you're someone like me and you don't have a large demand for getting builds done! I wanted to write about my experience with getting CircleCI wired up with BitBucket, which I like to use for my project hosting, and hopefully it'll help you get started. First thing, signing up is super easy if you have BitBucket because you can oauth right away with it. CircleCI will show you your projects & repositories that you have in BitBucket and you can decide which one you'd like to get started with. You can navigate to the projects in their new UI from the "Add Projects" menu. When you…

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xUnit Tests Not Running With .NET Standard

Having worked with C# for quite some time now writing desktop applications, I've begun making the transition over to .NET standard. In my professional working experience, it was a much slower transition because of product requirements and time, but in my own personal development there's no reason why I couldn't get started with it. And call me crazy, but I enjoy writing coded tests for the things I make. My favourite testing framework for my C# development is xUnit, and naturally as I started writing some new code with .NET Standard I wanted to make sure I could get my tests to run. Here's an example of some C# code I wrote for my unit tests of a simple LRU cache class I was playing around with: [ExcludeFromCodeCoverage] public sealed class LruCachetests { [Fact] public void Constructor_CapacityTooSmall_ThrowsArgumentException() { Assert.Throws<ArgumentException>(() =>…

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